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    As the world celebrates World Toilet Day, we are reminded that, despite worldwide efforts, 2.1 billion people worldwide still lack access to basic sanitation. The situation is becoming even more acute in urban areas because of increasing migration. Basic sanitation is widely recognized to have positive impacts on health and the economy, so why don’t cities do more to improve their sanitation systems?

     

    To understand why the international community is struggling to reach its sanitation goals, we must also understand the financial obstacles that are hampering progress. The costs of building safe sanitation systems and restoring and maintaining deteriorating infrastructure are too high, and the necessary investments can be unsustainable especially for developing countries.because it is difficult and expensive to provide good sanitation services, the issue often falls low on political priorities.

     

    The World Water Council is currently developing a program to identify innovative mechanisms to finance sanitation which are emerging across the world. The program is based on financial analysis of the sanitation sector in 8 cities around the globe. The case studies will form the basis for a report and policy recommendations for cities to be launched at the 8th World Water Forum in Brasilia.

     

    To contribute to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6.2 on access to sanitation,more efforts are required. By exploring and publicizing innovative financing instruments to increase sanitation provision and to involve more actors in the development of national sanitation financing plans, the Council’s program intends to help political authorities around the world tackle the sanitation crisis and support cities in which healthy, happy people can live sustainably.

    Read the more about the Council’s program on financing sanitation.

    World Toilet Day: Cities need new financial solutions to implement safe sanitation

    As the world celebrates World Toilet Day, we are reminded that, despite worldwide efforts, 2.1 billion people worldwide still lack ...

    In view of raising political awareness for water within the climate change discussions, the World Water Council and its partners are engaging in this year’s United Nations Climate Change Conference (CoP23), 6-17 November 2017, Bonn, Germany.

    In addition to carrying the voice of water with the #ClimateIsWater initiative, and supporting its members and their events throughout COP23, the Council is co-coordinating Water Day, which will be held on 10 November as part of the non-state actor engagement mechanism of the Marrakech Partnership for Global Climate Action (MPGCA).

    Water Day will highlight the innovative work that is being done by the Council and its partners and facilitate opportunities for increased collaboration moving forward. This year’s Water Day sessions are focused on exploring the critical linkages between water and the global climate adaptation, mitigation and finance agendas, knowledge and capacity development, as well as  Sustainable Development Goals 2 and 11 on Zero Hunger and Sustainable Cities and Communities respectively.

    Furthermore, on 11 November, the Council and the Moroccan Government will be co-organizing an event to launch the revised edition of the Blue Book, to highlight the Water for Africa initiative and to promote the King Hassan II World Water Prize.

    More about the Council’s Water and Climate program here.

    Raising awareness on water and climate at COP23

    In view of raising political awareness for water within the climate change discussions, the World Water Council and its partners ar...

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